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    I raised 2 successful CEOs and a physician. For those who’re doing these 7 things, you are a greater parent than most

    The important thing to successful parenting is knowing that you simply are the most important role model in your child’s life. From a really young age, they may watch closely and model themselves after you, so the way you act has a big impact on their behavior.

    I prefer to think that mindful modeling helped me raise highly successful daughters: Susan was the CEO of YouTube, Janet is a physician, and Anne is the co-founder and CEO of 23andMe.

    Based on my experience as a mom and educator, if you happen to’re already modeling these seven behaviors, you are doing higher than most:

    1. You are generally punctual.

    For those who cannot make the appointment, a minimum of call or text to let the opposite person know. It is common courtesy, and it’s about being willing to see the situation from the opposite person’s perspective.

    Punctuality shows respect for people’s time. Being habitually late shows the other. That is something I all the time stress to my students, in addition to to my kids and grandkids.

    2. You’ve gotten a healthy relationship with technology.

    This can be a big one. A recent survey found that Americans check their phones a median of 144 times a day, resulting in what technology expert Linda Stone calls “continuous partial attention.”

    And modeling this behavior is not only bad for youths who have to think about their homework. A 2022 study found that young children whose moms reported higher phone usage had more trouble recovering from emotional stress.

    3. You’ve gotten a healthy relationship with food.

    What do your general eating habits appear to be? Caring for your health is the very best approach to teach your kids to do the identical.

    In my family, my grandkids learned to read food labels early, and so they know to avoid processed junk food. In my classes, students know that I confiscate soda. No exceptions! Their health is significant to me because I care about them as human beings.

    4. You prioritize family.

    Even in divorced households, parents should model collaboration and cooperation. Prioritizing family also means sharing experiences, good and bad. This teaches kids the right way to address whatever life throws at them.

    Among the best ways to show the importance of family is to have a good time together. The more positive experiences, the more support the kid feels. It will possibly be just playing a board game, or going to the park, or jumping on a trampoline together.

    5. You do not mislead your kids.

    I feel all parents mislead their children at times. We are saying things like, “I do not think the ice cream store is open now.” After some time, kids catch on. But not every type of lies are harmful. It is the lies about significant issues that create a scarcity of trust.

    Telling your child that nobody else goes to the show is a giant problem after they discover that everybody else went to the show. Trust is the muse of all relationships, and the final thing you need to do is break that.

    6. You do not lose your temper.

    All of us yell sooner or later. But are you inadvertently teaching your kids that yelling is an appropriate way of communicating? Do you curse but get mad when your kids use foul language?

    It does no good to fake your emotions, but it surely would help to understand that anger doesn’t make things higher. It is a selection and lifestyle that we would like our kids to avoid.

    7. You are willing to confess once you’re improper.

    All of us discuss kindness and forgiveness, but that doesn’t suggest we actually know the right way to practice them.

    In all my many years of teaching, I’ve learned to forgive my students regardless of what. That doesn’t suggest no punishments, but it surely does mean that I all the time give them a probability to make something right.

    Though it’s painful to confess once I’m improper, I’ve found that it’s less painful than attempting to cover up a mistake I’ve made. I’m all the time learning and growing, and I need to model that for the subsequent generations.

    Esther Wojcicki is an educator, journalist, and bestselling writer of ” Raise Successful People.” She can be the co-founder of Tract.app and the chief parenting office at Sesh. Follow her on Twitter @EstherWojcicki.

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