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    The streets where it’s now CHEAPER to get a £65 ticket than paying to park all day: How traffic wardens could be a driver’s best friend in parts of London

    Sitting within the shadow of the Emirates Stadium, just yards from the statue of Thierry Henry knee-sliding his technique to everlasting victory over arch rivals Tottenham, are the brand new heroes of north London. 

    Despite paying hundreds of kilos for brand new vans to comply with London Mayor Sadiq Khan’s hated ULEZ zone, Islington’s politicians have shot up the worth of parking – even for plumbers, electricians and other trades – who provide vital services for people inside the borough. 

    Now white van drivers have discovered easy methods to beat their very own nemesis, the London Borough of Islington whose anti-motorist policies are driving tradesmen and ladies off the road. 

    On top of hourly parking charges that range from £2.50 to £6.30, Islington demands diesel drivers to pay an extra £6.50 an hour levy. 

    Such is the extent of the money grab, some firms have told their drivers to take a high-quality if working at a location for several hours because it is cheaper than paying for parking. Others say they must turn down work because the brand new ‘environmental’ charge makes certain smaller jobs unprofitable. 

    At traffic warden placing a parking ticket on a van parked within the shadow of Arsenal’s Emirates Stadium, where drivers must pay a £6.50-an-hour diesel levy on top of the bottom parking fee of between £2.50 and £6.30 an hour

    Some drivers who spoke to MailOnline said the diesel levy is killing business in the borough

    Some drivers who spoke to MailOnline said the diesel levy is killing business within the borough

    Depending on the situation, a parking ticket costs between £80 and £135. To cut back the number of individuals contesting the tickets, councils offer a 50 per cent reduction if the bill is settled inside 14 days. 

    Plumber Tony Lockhart said: ‘It’s killing people and businesses. Here’s the situation. Tickets are cheaper than paying per hour, it’s so simple as that.

    ‘Nevertheless it just cannot go on. It is a war on motorists – nevertheless it goes further than that. It’s class warfare. They simply don’t need working class people like me in London.’

    The 45-year-old, who works in Islington, added that the surcharge is having such a ‘disastrous’ effect that his business is having to show down jobs because they don’t seem to be profitable.

    ‘We now have to show jobs down on a regular basis if we will not park there,’ he said. ‘There’s just nothing we will do.’

    Islington claims the diesel surcharge is necessary to improve air quality in the borough

    Islington claims the diesel surcharge is mandatory to enhance air quality within the borough 

    Tradesman Michael Ovppong, 43, admitted that his boss sometimes 'authorises' a parking fine for him while he's out working. Sometimes my boss tells me to just take the parking fine because it's cheaper than paying for parking with the diesel surcharge'

    Tradesman Michael Ovppong, 43, admitted that his boss sometimes ‘authorises’ a parking high-quality for him while he’s out working. Sometimes my boss tells me to simply take the parking high-quality since it’s cheaper than paying for parking with the diesel surcharge’

    Plumber Tony Lockhart said: 'It's killing people and businesses. Here's the situation. Tickets are cheaper than paying per hour, it's as simple as that. But it just can't go on. This is a war on motorists – but it goes further than that. It's class warfare. They simply don't want working class people like me in London'

    Plumber Tony Lockhart said: ‘It’s killing people and businesses. Here’s the situation. Tickets are cheaper than paying per hour, it’s so simple as that. Nevertheless it just cannot go on. It is a war on motorists – nevertheless it goes further than that. It’s class warfare. They simply don’t need working class people like me in London’

    Tradesman Michael Ovppong, 43, admitted that his boss sometimes ‘authorises’ a parking high-quality for him while he’s out working.

    ‘Sometimes my boss tells me to simply take the parking high-quality since it’s cheaper than paying for parking with the diesel surcharge.

    ‘The opposite issue is that these places where you might have to pay for parking – you are only allowed to be there for 2 hours. When you’re on a job for eight hours, it isn’t possible to maintain moving your automobile. You simply cannot work like that.’

    ‘These extra taxes on motorists, it’s making it not possible for people like me to do my job.’

    Tradesmen complain they have to carry expensive tools, including knives, hammers and saws which are not welcome on board public transport

    Tradesmen complain they must carry expensive tools, including knives, hammers and saws which will not be welcome on board public transport

    Myrvin Kirwin, 45, works for Virgin Media. He said: 'The stress around extortionate parking fees and PCNs also makes it difficult to do your job properly. I spend my whole time worrying about whether I'm getting slapped with a ticket or running up a huge cost. I can't focus.'

    Myrvin Kirwin, 45, works for Virgin Media. He said: ‘The stress around extortionate parking fees and PCNs also makes it difficult to do your job properly. I spend my whole time worrying about whether I’m getting slapped with a ticket or running up an enormous cost. I am unable to focus.’

    Meanwhile, Rob Considine, 26, who works at Premier Plumbing Merchants – based just in front of Arsenal Football Stadium – admitted: ‘My colleagues and I even have needed to resort to avoiding parking our vans if possible, just to maintain things afloat.

    His boss added: ‘The diesel surcharge is killing the business. I do not understand what van drivers are expected to do. What’s going to occur to us?’

    Myrvin Kirwin, who drives vans for Virgin Media, slammed the diesel surcharge as ‘greedy’. He said: ‘They’re already accumulating money in so many other ways. How are people expected to survive?’

    Rob Considine, 26, who works at Premier Plumbing Merchants - based just in front of Arsenal Football Stadium – admitted: 'My colleagues and I have had to resort to avoiding parking our vans if possible, just to keep things afloat'

    Rob Considine, 26, who works at Premier Plumbing Merchants – based just in front of Arsenal Football Stadium – admitted: ‘My colleagues and I even have needed to resort to avoiding parking our vans if possible, just to maintain things afloat’

    For engineer Bojan Subotic, 52, things have reached a stage that he may find something else to do. 'I've considered other professions,' he said. 'It's all a cash grab, you see. It makes you wonder whether it's worth it.'

    For engineer Bojan Subotic, 52, things have reached a stage that he may find something else to do. ‘I’ve considered other professions,’ he said. ‘It’s all a money grab, you see. It makes you ponder whether it’s value it.’

    ‘The stress around extortionate parking fees and PCNS also makes it difficult to do your job properly,’ the 45-year-old added.

    ‘I spend my whole time worrying about whether I’m getting slapped with a ticket or running up an enormous cost. I am unable to focus.’

    For engineer Bojan Subotic, 52, things have reached a stage that he may find something else to do.  ‘I’ve considered other professions,’ he said. ‘It’s all a money grab, you see. It makes you ponder whether it’s value it.’

    He also said it would put self-employed people out of business. ‘Because I work for an organization,’ Mr Subotic said, ‘I’m capable of claim things back on expenses – but for people working for themselves, it’s not possible.’

    ‘People running their very own businesses must think about all this stuff: diesel surcharge, congestion charge, ULEZ.

    ‘So then they must charge the client more, which eventually goes to place people out of business amidst a value of living crisis. It’s so simple as that.’

    MailOnline has approached Islington Council for a comment.  

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